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Ford Mustang GT Fastback v Nissan 370Z Coupe comparison

We all know the  is far from being the newest kid on the block – it was . But it’s also the only sports car offered by the Japanese brand, outside of the circa-$200k .

Blending classic coupe styling with good proportions and lovingly pumped guards, the 370Z is muscular without being lairy or overly aggressive. Its tidy rear spoiler and aerial-free roof keep things clean, while its F1-style central rear fog light, dual exhausts, and red-painted front and rear brake calipers add touches of sportiness.

The new  first, building interest and hopes with its combination of a 5.0-litre V8, limited-slip rear differential, and long-awaited (read: needed) employment of independent rear suspension (IRS).

As eye-catching as it is, it’s often best not to look too closely at a Mustang.

Shonky panel gaps and inconsistent shut lines are easily noticeable upon closer inspection, and while the bonnet strakes, scalloped roof, and muscle-car guards look the part, the hard and scratchy black plastic front lip, side skirts, and rear garnish are a way off being high quality. The flagship Mustang’s rear ‘GT’ badge, dual exhausts, clear tail-lights, body-coloured rear diffuser, and Brembo front calipers, however, are arguably better highlights.

Importantly for this test though, both cars have two doors, a big, naturally-aspirated engine up front, and exclusively send drive to their rear wheels. So it’s game on.

Hand-on-heart time. Rather than a long-planned headline act, this twin test came about after our brand-new 2017 Ford Mustang GT long-termer (stay tuned for more on this) rolled into the Melbourne garage at the same time as a ‘new’ 2017 Nissan 370Z. With two near-identically priced rear-drive sports cars sitting there waiting to be driven, the decision was made to put the pair to the test.
Hand-on-heart time. Rather than a long-planned headline act, this twin test came about after our brand-new 2017 Ford Mustang GT long-termer (stay tuned for more on this) rolled into the Melbourne garage at the same time as a ‘new’ 2017 Nissan 370Z. With two near-identically priced rear-drive sports cars sitting there waiting to be driven, the decision was made to put the pair to the test.

Hand-on-heart time. Rather than a long-planned headline act, this twin test came about after our brand-new 2017 Mustang GT long-termer  rolled into the Melbourne garage at the same time as a ‘new’ 2017 370Z. With two near-identically priced rear-drive sports cars sitting there waiting to be driven, the decision was made to put the pair to the test.

Helping to provide a wider spread of opinion and assessment, we called in CarAdvice’s resident  queen and  fanatic,

A keen hillclimb fan and someone who missed out on driving the ‘Stang and the Z at our  Mandy was only too happy to be involved.

With the two cars fuelled up and all tyre pressures set to manufacturer recommendations – 32psi front and rear for both cars, for those playing at home – we headed off on our 150km-odd road loop, comprising two urban traffic legs, two highway blasts, and some super-challenging but super-entertaining curving, dipping, and diving Victorian blacktop. Fun

Priced from $57,490 and $56,930 respectively (before on-road costs), the 2017  and 2017  sit between the likes of the $43,890  and $74,900

Teaming its 5.0-litre V8 powerplant with the standard six-speed manual transmission, our Triple Yellow Mustang is only $500 up on the above figure, while our seven-speed automatic Shiro White 370Z tips the scales at an as-tested $59,930 (before on-road costs).

Powered by a 3.7-litre VQ-series Nissan V6, the 370Z churns out 245kW of power at 7000rpm and 363Nm of torque at 5200rpm, and claims to drink 10.4 litres of 95-octane premium unleaded fuel every 100km.

Priced from $57,490 and $56,930 respectively (before on-road costs), the 2017 nd 2017  sit between the likes of the $43,890  and $74,900

Teaming its 5.0-litre V8 powerplant with the standard six-speed manual transmission, our Triple Yellow Mustang is only $500 up on the above figure, while our seven-speed automatic Shiro White 370Z tips the scales at an as-tested $59,930 (before on-road costs).

Powered by a 3.7-litre VQ-series Nissan V6, the 370Z churns out 245kW of power at 7000rpm and 363Nm of torque at 5200rpm, and claims to drink 10.4 litres of 95-octane premium unleaded fuel every 100km.

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3 Comments
  1. george 4 months ago

    luxurious

  2. george 4 months ago

    Hello Test user

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Standard features

  • Dual Front Airbag Package
  • Anti-lock Braking
  • Auto Climate Control with Dual Temp Zones
  • 17 Inch Alloy Wheels
  • Brake Assist
  • Cruise Control
  • Central Locking Remote Control
  • Dusk Sensing Headlights
  • Electronic Brake Force Distribution
  • Electronic Differential Lock
  • Electronic Stability Program
  • Fog Lights – Front
  • Head Airbags
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Leather Upholstery
  • Multi Function Steering Wheel
  • Parking Distance Control Rear
  • Power front seats
  • Power Mirrors With Indicators
  • Power Steering
  • Power Windows
  • Radio CD with 10 Speakers
  • Rain Sensing Wipers
  • Seatbelts – Pre-tensioners Front Seats

Specifications

Price: $19,000.00

Kilometers: 130000

Drive train: Rear Wheel Drive

Transmission: Manual

Colour: Silver

Components: Featured

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