Bryce Canyon A Stunning US
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Editor Reviews

2000Km

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Metal

The 2017 Toyota Corolla SX has sporty looks and decent road manners, and it now comes with new optional safety tech – but it’s still a bit short of the best in class.

If you’re planning to buy a small car this year, there’s every chance a 2017 Toyota Corolla is on your list.

The  has been a family name for 50 years, and with this SX model there have been some modern technology options added for buyers to choose if they want.

The SX model is offered with a new safety pack as a $750 option (also on the Ascent, Ascent Sport and Hybrid models), while the pack is standard equipment in the flagship ZR.

The new optional pack includes forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking (which works at speeds from 10-80km/h), along with lane departure alert and automatic high-beam headlights.

The forward collision avoidance system works using a windscreen-mounted camera and LIDAR to identify and warn (beep) or take action (prime the brakes, and actually brake if required), if a possible crash is imminent. Unlike some other systems, there’s no adaptive cruise control function built in to the tech.

Lane departure alert likewise uses LIDAR to identify lane markings to trigger warnings if the vehicle begins to leave the lane without the turn signal active. Unlike lane-keeping assist systems, it will not adjust the steering for you: it’ll just beep to warn you that you’ve made a mistake. It works over 50km/h, and it beeps fairly often – six times, in fact, unless you correct your course.

Just 12 months ago this sort of technology was almost exotic at this price point, but now you can get similar systems in plenty of small cars, like the  and  – in the latter, AEB is standard across the range, but spec-for-spec the Corolla is a little cheaper, obviously leaving the choice to buyers if they want to spend the money on the technology or not.

Drives quite nicely at high and low speeds More involving than you might think a Corolla would be Willing enough drivetrain in Sport mode Affordable to buy and own Comfortable as a daily cruiser
Falls short of the best in class for equipment Not as spacious in the rear as some rivals Boot a little smaller than best in class CVT auto can chug up hills

If you’re planning to buy a small car this year, there’s every chance a 2017 Toyota Corolla is on your list.

The has been a family name for 50 years, and with this  SX model there have been some modern technology options added for buyers to choose if they want.

The SX model is offered with a new safety pack as a $750 option (also on the Ascent, Ascent Sport and Hybrid models), while the pack is standard equipment in the flagship ZR.

The new optional pack includes forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking (which works at speeds from 10-80km/h), along with lane departure alert and automatic high-beam headlights.

The forward collision avoidance system works using a windscreen-mounted camera and LIDAR to identify and warn (beep) or take action (prime the brakes, and actually brake if required), if a possible crash is imminent. Unlike some other systems, there’s no adaptive cruise control function built in to the tech.

Lane departure alert likewise uses LIDAR to identify lane markings to trigger warnings if the vehicle begins to leave the lane without the turn signal active. Unlike lane-keeping assist systems, it will not adjust the steering for you: it’ll just beep to warn you that you’ve made a mistake. It works over 50km/h, and it beeps fairly often – six times, in fact, unless you correct your course.

Just 12 months ago this sort of technology was almost exotic at this price point, but now you can get similar systems in plenty of small cars, like the  and  – in the latter, AEB is standard across the range, but spec-for-spec the Corolla is a little cheaper, obviously leaving the choice to buyers if they want to spend the money on the technology or not.

One of the main bugbears (in terms of driving) with the SV6 we’ll get to in more detail in a minute is the engine. We wouldn’t hesitate to recommend a , but conversely, this V6 failed to excite us during our test period. On paper though, the numbers stack up relatively impressively.

The engine generates 210kW and 350Nm and is backed by a six-speed automatic transmission. The 71-litre fuel tank promises genuine touring ability on the open road, with the claimed ADR fuel use at 9.3L/100km. On test, mainly around town, we used an indicated 12.9L/100km. That figure starts to drop well into single figures on the freeway though, once you’re cruising, so if you cover long distances, the SV6 is a contender.

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Standard features

  • Dual Front Airbag Package
  • Anti-lock Braking
  • Auto Climate Control with Dual Temp Zones
  • 17 Inch Alloy Wheels
  • Brake Assist
  • Cruise Control
  • Central Locking Remote Control
  • Dusk Sensing Headlights
  • Electronic Brake Force Distribution
  • Electronic Differential Lock
  • Electronic Stability Program
  • Fog Lights – Front
  • Head Airbags
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Leather Upholstery
  • Multi Function Steering Wheel
  • Parking Distance Control Rear
  • Power front seats
  • Power Mirrors With Indicators
  • Power Steering
  • Power Windows
  • Radio CD with 10 Speakers
  • Rain Sensing Wipers
  • Seatbelts – Pre-tensioners Front Seats

Specifications

Price: $1,990.00

Kilometers: 283671

Drive train: Front Wheel Drive

Transmission: Automatic

Colour: Silver

Air Conditioning: Yes

Stock Number: 802104

Body Type: Wagon

Registration Number: JC3510

VIN: 6U900000E51067763

Components: New

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